Familiarize Yourself With Sardinian Pasta Shapes To Prepare For Your Visit

Published on January 16, 2022
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Sardinia’s culinary scene is best known for its Moor-inspired seafood dishes as well as its volcanic wines. However, you might not know that the Mediterranean island also has its own specific pasta style, a lot of which are unknown beyond the shores of the island.

Sardinian Pasta

Sardinian Pasta

Before you visit Sardinia, you should get to know these shapes so that you can sample them all while you’re there. Have you heard of or seen any of these pasta shapes? Enjoy these pasta shapes made of Karalis, a Sardinian wheat, alongside Pecorino Sardo.

Andarinos

Andarinos are twisted pasta shapes that are made in Usini, a northern Sardinian town that has a festival that honors the pasta each summer.

The shape most resembles a corkscrew that’s made by folding the pasta dough four times around a dowel or reed and is perfect for holding sauce. It is usually served with mixed-meat ragu called ragù su ghisadu.

Andarinos

Andarinos

Lorighittas

This beautiful pasta shape is made to look like oblong braided loops, which is why they’re called “iron rings” in Sardinian. They come from Morgongiori, which is on the southern slopes of Monte Arci massif.

Historically, they were prepared on All Saints’ Day. Kids were told to be afraid of Maria Pungi Pungi, a witch that would pierce the stomach of a kid who ate too many lorighittas.

Lorighittas

Lorighittas

Ciccioneddus

Ciccioneddus are like the Sardinian version of gnocchi. These ridged, compact dumplings are served in Ittiri, a northwestern town, and traditionally served at weddings. They are served with a lamb herb sauce. It makes sense since sheep outnumber people in Sardinia two to one.

Ciccioneddus

Ciccioneddus